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Lead Testing Resources for Ohioans and Their Children

I may have been exposed to lead. What do I do?
If you believe you have been in contact with lead, you should contact your health care provider, who can help you decide whether or you should have a blood test to test for lead.

My child may have been exposed to lead. What do I do?
Any exposure to lead is potentially harmful for a child; there is no “safe” level of lead exposure. Children and pregnant women who have been exposed to high levels of lead should be tested. If you believe your child has been in contact with lead, you should contact his or her health care provider, who can help you decide whether or not your child should have a blood test to test for lead. Your child’s health care provider can also help recommend treatment and resources if your child has been exposed to lead.

This Childhood Lead Risk Assessment form can also help you decide whether or not to have the test done.

Ohioans who need additional information on lead poisoning or how to get tested can call 1-877-LEADSAFE (1-877-532-3723).

You can also visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website or call the toll-free number 1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636).

Getting Your Child Tested
Most children with high levels of lead in their blood have no symptoms. A blood lead test is the only way to find out if your child has a high lead level. Having blood drawn from your child’s vein is more accurate than a finger stick test.

If you believe your child has been in contact with lead, you should contact their health care provider, who can help you decide whether or not your child should have a blood test to test for lead. Your child’s health care provider can also help recommend treatment and resources if your child has been exposed to lead.

After Your Child is Tested for Lead
If your child has had a blood lead test and the results come back higher than 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (5ug/dL). The Ohio Department of Health has put together a helpful brochure for what to do if your child’s blood lead test comes back higher than 5ug/dL, which can be found here.

I’m pregnant and I may have been exposed to lead. What do I do?
Children and pregnant women who have been exposed to high levels of lead should be tested. If you are pregnant and concerned about lead exposure, contact your health care provider. You can also use this Prenatal Risk Assessment form to help decide whether or not to get tested if you are unsure about your level of exposure.

Ohioans who need additional information on lead poisoning or how to get tested can call 1-877-LEADSAFE (1-877-532-3723).

You can also visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website or call the toll-free number 1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636).

Health Recommendations for Village of Sebring
The Village of Sebring has recently issued a drinking water advisory for pregnant women, infants, and children because recent tests have revealed lead levels exceeding the federal action level of 15 parts per billion (ppb) in seven homes in the distribution system. The Mahoning County District Board of Health has created a website with resources and updates for Ohioans affected by the advisory.