Brown Announces More Than $6 Million to Increase Conservation on Ohio’s Farmlands

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is awarding $6,755,745 to help Ohio farmers implement and evaluate innovative approaches to farmland conservation. The funding is provided through On-Farm Conservation Innovation Trials (On-Farm Trials), a new component of the Conservation Innovation Grants first authorized in the 2018 Farm Bill. The awards include:

  • $1,788,545 to Brookside Laboratories to implement enhanced efficiency fertilizer trials using new scientific protocol and an adaptive management approach,
  • $1,967,200 to Water Resources Monitoring Group LLC to investigate Cover Crops for Soil Health in the Great Lakes Region and,
  • $3,000,000 to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for “Measuring Outcomes of Holistic Soil Health Management” – a case study from a corporate supply chain

“From Lake Erie to the Ohio River, our state faces many water quality challenges. Today’s announcement will ensure that farmers are implementing innovative approaches to improve soil health and reduce nutrient runoff,” Brown said, “Agriculture is one of Ohio’s leading industries and these resources will help Ohio farmers implement cutting-edge conservation practices that will make farms more productive and efficient in the years ahead.”

On-Farm Trials awardees work with NRCS and farmers and ranchers to implement innovative practices and systems on their lands that have not yet been widely adopted by producers. Awardees are required to evaluate the conservation and economic outcomes from these practices and systems, giving NRCS critical information to inform conservation work in the future.

Brown has been a leader for Ohio’s rural communities, successfully securing a number of provisions that are important to Ohio farmers in the 2018 Farm Bill. He is the first Ohioan to serve on the Senate Agriculture Committee in more than 50 years.

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