Cincinnati WFTR

CINCINNATI, OH – Today, U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) joined southwest Ohioans in Cincinnati as he leads the Working Families Tax Relief Act

  • Brown’s tax cuts would benefit 4 million Ohioans, including 1.7 million children in the state.  

At a time when wages are stagnant and the cost of childcare has exploded, the Working Families Tax Relief Act would cut taxes for workers and families by expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC). EITC and CTC are two of the most effective tools we have to put money in the pockets of working people and pull children out of poverty. Expanding them will give millions more Americans a foothold in the middle class. 

Meanwhile, the day after Tax Day, Americans are getting smaller refunds and more people are seeing President Trump’s and the Congressional Republicans’ tax scam for what it really was – a handout to millionaires and billionaires at the expense of working families. The Working Families Tax Relief Act would cut taxes for workers and families left behind by the President’s tax law.   

“All across the country, families are working harder than ever but have less and less to show for it. Corporate profits have soared, executive compensation has exploded, but wages are flat. Meanwhile the cost of everything from healthcare to education and housing is up,” said Brown. “Our bill would help put more money back in the pockets of working families and set children up for future success.” 

The bill also allows workers to draw a $500 advance payment on their EITC so that families aren’t forced to turn to predatory payday lenders when the car breaks down or other unexpected expenses come up.  Payday loans are generally made to individuals who are working and often eligible for the EITC. The average payday loan is about $375. 

Brown was joined by Meghan Cummings, Executive Director of the Women’s Fund of the Greater Cincinnati Foundation as well as Ms. Danielle Burris, a southwest Ohioan who has benefitted from EITC and CTC in the past. Both spoke about the importance of passing Brown’s bill. 

“The Women’s Fund has conducted significant research on the impact of public benefits programs on working families, and have learned that the journey to economic self-sufficiency is complex and frustrating. That’s why expanding the EITC and CTC is so critical. Compared to other social assistance programs, these tax credits are simple. They put cash in hand directly to those most in need, who can use this money to support whatever their unique needs require,” said Cummings.

“The EITC and CTC have helped me improve my family's life and well being. With the extra money, I have been able to purchase things for my children, such as new beds, clothing, and other things at a sale price, instead of pinching pennies together. I have been able to pay off past due debts that I wouldn't be able to pay living check to check. It may not be much to others, but it has helped improve my credit score and will allow us the chance of home ownership,” said Ms. Burris. 

VISIT TO OYLER SCHOOL: 

While in Cincinnati, Brown also visited Oyler School. In August, Brown introduced The Full-Service Community Schools in Distressed Communities Act to help Ohio school districts and students working to achieve academic success in light of Ohio’s addiction epidemic. Full-service community schools, which provide comprehensive academic, social, and health services, have a proven record of success in meeting the needs of students, families, and their communities and can help address the needs of students in Ohio communities hit particularly hard by the opioid epidemic. Cincinnati Public Schools has been a national leader in the full-service community school model.

The Working Families Tax Relief Act would: 

  • Boost the incomes of 46 million households and 114 million people, including 43 million children. 
  • Lift 7 million people out of poverty, including 3 million children
  • Expand the EITC for families with children by roughly 25 percent.
  • Allow workers to draw a $500 advance payment on their EITC so that families aren’t forced to turn to predatory payday lenders when the car breaks down or other unexpected expenses come up. The average payday loan is about $375.
  • Significantly expand the EITC for workers without children and make the credit available for people starting at age 19 up to age 67. Currently, workers without children can be pulled under the poverty line by taxes. Expanding the EITC would fix that.  
  • Make the CTC fully refundable, so the more than 26 million children who were left out of the Trump tax law get the support they deserve. 
  • Create a Young Child Tax Credit to provide extra support to children five and under, when research says they need it most.  

Read more about the bill HERE.

 

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